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    Lennie analysis Essay

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    Lennie, a character in the novel Of Mice and Men, was a timid good hearted man whose personality, appearance and nature set him apart from others while enabling unique friendships to flourish. Lennie’s humble personality helped him develop a number of these relationships on the ranch. Candy, “a tall stoop shouldered old man,” was the first person Lennie met on the farm. Candy always carried a “big push- broom in his left hand” and was a quiet soul, Just like Lennie. Lennie felt sympathy for Candy being that he had lost “his hand right here on this ranch. His “right hand” referred to is dog that had been shot the day Lennie had arrived on the ranch. In hopes of bringing up Candys spirits, Lennie invited Candy to Join him on the pursuit of a dream to buy “a little piece of land. ” The land signified freedom and a chance for a real home Lennie and Candy both. Crooks was “the negro stable buck” who had a crippled back “where a horse kicked him” while working on the ranch. Crooks wanted nothing more than to share in this dream with Lennie and Candy.

    Crooks even offered to “lend a hand” for nothing in return Just for the opportunity to share in this dream land. Lennie as a good listener which helped to build a relationship with Crooks; a relationship desperately needed by Crooks since he was considered somewhat of an outcast due nls color. one 0T tne otner rancn nanas, curley, naa a wlTe wno was DeautlTul wltn her “bright cotton dress” and her “little sausage curls” all in place around her head. She loved the thought of pursuing dreams too and even shared with Lennie how she “coulda made somethin’ of” herself.

    Her dreams were slowly shattered being married since she “cant talk to nobody but Curley. ” Curly’s wife breaks the rules to talk to Lennie nyway because he is the only guy that will actually listen to her and be a friend. Lennie was benevolent, but similar to animals due to his below average intelligence and overpowering strength. Lennie resembled a bear with his incredible strength and his gangly presence which frightened people. Lennie was “a huge man” who walked “dragging his feet, the way a bear drags his paws. Although his presence could be alarming, his paws brought him happiness and protection as he “dabbled his big paw in the water” while entertaining himself or as he “covered his face ith huge paws and bleated with terror” when Curley was abusing him. Lennie Small could also be compared to a mouse with his absentminded behavior, his battles of helplessness and the inability to make decisions for himself. These behaviors are exhibited when Lennie doesn’t react to Curlers abusive blows until George says “get ‘Im Lennie. Lennie relies on George so much to make decisions for him that Lennie becomes uncomfortable when George is not around. Not sure of how to act for himself, Lennle squlrms “unaer tne 100K” ana moves “nls Teet nervously’ wnen otner people look at him or try to talk to him. Mice are skittish creatures that tend to avoid trouble and circumstances where they may feel threatened. Lennie is the same way as he avoids talking or even looking at people to refrain from getting in trouble. Unlike a bear and a mouse, a dog will obey his master and be eager to please.

    George could be considered the master of Lennie as he tells him when he “ain’t gonna say nothin’,” or who he “ain’t gonna talk to. ” Most dogs have a short attention span as well which is closely related to Lennie’s character. Lennie’s brawny appearance and mental struggles set him apart from everyone lse on the ranch. Lennie’s mental disabilities were caused from lack of education and inexperience in learning to care for himself. Education wasn’t held in high importance so Lennie never had the opportunity to learn how to read or speak correctly.

    Lennie’s speaking skills did not have a chance to form since George always seemed to answer for him in every situation. Lennie was also “a hell ofa good worker” who could “put up more grain alone than most pairs can. ” The other workers were laborers but did not have a strong desire to please like Lennie possessed. Lennie believed that if he worked eally hard, he could prove to George that he was responsible enough “to tend to the rabbits”; something that made Lennie very happy because he was obsessed with soft tnlngs.

    Lennie usea to nave a piece 0T velvet tnat nls “own Aunt Clara” naa given to him but over time “he lost it. ” Lennie then moved onto bigger objects that were soft such puppies and even on to humans. People found him to be weird when he so badly wanted “to feel that girl’s dress” or started “stroking her hair” which ultimately made him an outcast of sorts. This obsession with soft things led to a sorrowful loss of innocence and the shameful demise of Lennie.

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